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The islamic fashion market is growing faster and a massively in the world


The islamic fashion market is growing faster and a massively in the world

The islamic fashion market is growing faster and a massively in the world

Around $266 billion was spent on clothing and footwear by Muslim consumers in 2013.

 

 

 

According to a Thomson Reuters report, around $266 billion was spent on clothing and footwear by Muslim consumers in 2013. This amounts to around 12% of total global expenditure on clothing (a 10% increase from 2012). The market for Muslim fashion is projected to account for over 14% of the global fashion market by 2019.

While the market for e-commerce in this arena is still relatively small, it is also growing faster than conventional fashion sales online; it expanded at a rate of 25.4% in 2013, as compared to 5.8% growth in conventional fashion-related e-commerce.

Around $266 billion was spent on clothing and footwear by Muslim consumers in 2013.

Demographics also play a role in this burgeoning market. While the average age of citizens is around 30 in majority-Muslim countries, Europe and the US has an average population age of 44. Because the purchasing power of young consumers should grow over time, the market for Muslim goods will thrive for years to come.

In the context of Islamic law, requirements for dress are more modest than much of traditional fashion. Men should be covered from navel to knee, and women should cover all that is apparent, which generally entails wearing loose-fitting clothing on all visible skin aside from the face, and often covering the hair as well. There is much debate around whether the full-face covering is obligatory or merely recommended. The word hijab has come to refer to headscarfs generally, but its literal translation from Arabic is closer to “covering” or “curtain.” Scholars debating the translation and interpretation of the Qur’anic injunction have not always agreed on how much women have to cover.

This means there is no universal wardrobe for a Muslim woman. Muslim women wear colorful salwaar kameez in India, abayas in Dubai, long shirts and coats in Turkey, and Western clothing in South Africa, the US, and the UK with modifications for modesty.

A few years ago, there were limited options for modest dress, but now major fashion houses and boutique brands are fusing fashion with modesty. For example, Dolce & Gabbana has launched an abaya and hijab line, and in countries like Dubai, the range of expensive abayas is astonishing; flowing designs, Swarovski-embellished, and produced in an assortment of fabrics, these abayas are not your average black cloak. Louella, the start-up modest fashion line founded by the US Olympic fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad is one of the exciting new companies operating in this space.

There is also potential for growth in the cosmetics industry, where food and fashion collide. As women unintentionally consume some of their lipstick over the course of the day, it must be halal because some lipsticks contain animal fat. Some Muslims stick to producers who go vegan, but again, that really limits the range of beauty products. The halal cosmetics industry is a largely untouched market.

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